Best Friends Pet Care : The Dog Dish
Best Friends Pet Care : The Dog Dish
Best Friends Pet Care : The Dog Dish

Tag Archives: Pets

Four Travel Tips for You and Your Pet

giphy (1)

Spring has sprung and so has the travel season. If you are planning a trip this spring or beyond, here are some quick Best Friend’s tips on traveling with your pet this vacation season.

Read More…

 

Tip 1: Make Sure Your Pet is Up to Date on Vaccines.

Look up pet laws for the location you are traveling to. Many states and countries have different requirements on what your pet should be vaccinated on. Be sure to also look into the potential health hazards a pet may come across as fleas, ticks, and other pests can vary by region.

Many hotels require pets to be up to date on vaccines and have had a recent check up by a veterinarian within the last year. Be sure to carry paperwork of your pet’s medical records in case these are needed during your pets stay. Best Friend’s has excellent guidelines on what to have on hand when you check your pet in with us. Feel free to use our Disney location’s requirements as a checklist on what your pet should be up to date on when traveling.

 

Tip 2: Microchip Your Fur Baby. 

When visiting a veterinarian, make sure your pet’s medical records are up to date and be sure to get your pet microchipped as well. Things can happen that are beyond our control while traveling. Microchipping is an easy way to locate your pet if they wander off or get lost while traveling.

Tip 3: Pack for Your Pet as If You are Packing for Yourself.

When packing for your fur baby, be sure to think of what is essential for them to enjoy the trip. Water, food, treats, toys, and any supplements they require. We recommend treating them with Flea & Tick medication before traveling to wooded areas. Make sure you pack items that will help your pet relax and enjoy their vacation with you.

Tip 4: Check if Your Pet Has an Anxiety Towards Traveling.

Have you traveled with your fur baby before? If not, we suggest taking your pet for a few short car rides around town a few weeks leading up to the trip. If your fur baby shows nausea or signs of anxiety such as whimpering during the car ride, you may want to consult your veterinarian for treatment. They may be able to recommend medication or training that can make the trip easier on your pet. You may also want to consider a stay-cation at your nearest Best Friends Pet Hotel location.

 

We hope these four tips will help you in planning your next trip with your pet this spring! Let us know in the comments below any tips you have when traveling with your pets. Happy travels!

 

Are you planning a trip this spring season and are a new customer to Best Friends? Remember, your first night with us is FREE! Click here for more details. *Offer not valid at Florida locations.


Tags: Cats, Dogs, Pet travel, Pets, Traveling with Pets

A Secured Pet is a Safe Pet: Reduce Serious Risks by Restraining Pets on Car Rides

Trips with Pets
Only a few short decades ago, buckling up was optional for drivers and their passengers, and people were generally unaware of the serious dangers posed by riding in cars without safety belts. Today, all that has changed. Everyone uses a seatbelt, and wisely so. Those riding in the front seat can reduce their risk of fatal injuries by 45 percent and their risk of moderate to critical injury by 50 percent, just by buckling up. In addition, rear seat passengers riding without seatbelts increase the death rate of front seat passengers by up to 5 times.

Unfortunately, while our human passengers are now much safer on road trips, the same can’t be said for our pets. We are still woefully unaware of the importance of securing our furry family members on car rides.

Pet travel is on the rise, and with it is the number of pets who suffer serious injuries from being improperly secured on car rides. In fact, unrestrained or improperly restrained pets can pose a number of serious dangers, both to themselves, and to every passenger in the car.

Even pet travelers who are normally very tranquil and well-behaved can react unexpectedly during a car ride. They may become anxious, overly excited, or frightened. They may jump, run, make noise, or climb the seats – all of which can distract even the most conscientious driver and cause an accident.

What’s more, in the event of an accident, or even a sudden swerve or stop, an unrestrained pet can potentially become a very real hazard. During an accident, a vehicle traveling at just 30 mph can transform a harmless 15-pound child into a projectile with a force of 675 pounds. At the same speed, a 60 pound dog becomes a lethal 2700 pound projectile, which could very easily be flung into a windshield, or another passenger.

Other threats loom after car crashes, as well. In the aftermath of an accident, it’s very possible for a frightened pet to run away, run into traffic, or attack rescue workers or good samaritans who are trying to help.

Pet parents who are responsible in every other way often overlook the dangers of failing to restrain their pets. Many assume that because they’re just headed to the bank, or the pet store, or the dog park a couple of miles away, they’re relatively safe. However, most accidents occur during short trips around town – not on busy highways.

Fortunately, there are plenty of ways to safely restrain your pet without restricting his freedom or fun. A wide variety of vehicle restraint options are available for pet parents, and with a little research, you can find one that will perfectly suit your individual pet’s needs. Pet safety belts, pet car seats (with built-in seat belts), pet travel crates & kennels, and vehicle pet barriers are some of the best and safest choices.

Whichever pet restraint method you choose, be sure that you know how to use it properly, and that you give your pet ample time to adapt. If you choose a travel crate, you should begin acclimating him to it inside your home.

Place some of your pet’s favorite toys, loveys, or blankets inside the crate. Let your pet explore the crate, and go in and out at will. Once he seems used to the crate, place it in your vehicle and put him inside. Take a short car ride or two, then longer and longer rides until he seems completely comfortable.

If you choose a pet safety belt, let your pet wear the harness around the house, and give him time to get used to the feel of it before strapping them in the car. Start out with short car rides, then gradually extend them, just as you would the crate.

A couple of final tips: regardless of your chosen method of restraint, back seat or cargo area travel is always safest. Also, while your pet’s safety is essential, so is his comfort. Make sure his “seat” is comfortable, and that his restraint fits well and is properly placed.
Our pets depend completely on us for their care and their safety. Let’s do right by them, and make sure they are as safe and secure as our other family members in the car.

TripsWithPets.com is the premier online pet friendly travel guide — providing online reservations at over 30,000 pet friendly hotels & accommodations across the U.S. and Canada. When planning a trip, pet parents go to TripsWithPets.com for detailed, up-to-date information on hotel pet policies and pet amenities. TripsWithPets.com also features airline & car rental pet policies, pet friendly activities, a user-friendly search-by-route option, as well as pet travel gear. For more information, please visit http://www.tripswithpets.com

Tags: Dogs, Pet health, Pet Safety, Pet travel, Pets, Travel with pets

Heartworms 101: Part 2

Sitting PugWhat are the signs and how is heartworm infection diagnosed?

 So if you read the first part of our series (insert link), you now have a better sense of how these dreaded little creatures get into our pets. Now let’s talk about what they do once they get in there and how they can make our fur babies so miserable.

How does heartworm infection become heartworm disease?

So once this parasite sets up shop in your dog or cat, the male and female adult worms make more baby worms (microfilariae). As this cycle of reproduction goes on over months to years, the adult worms are continuously causing damage to the inside of the heart. In the case of cats, the problems are even more severe since the worms are actually in the lungs and wreaking havoc there.

These worms can cause disease in a variety of ways.

  • They cause inflammation
  • They cause an obstruction in blood flow
  • They cause an allergic reaction

Any of these issues will lead to clinical signs that can vary from mild to severe. Some pets, specifically dogs, can have an infection and show no signs at all early in the disease process.  These clinical signs can also be seen as worms die, either from old age or due to treatment (more on this in the next part of our series).

The most common signs of heartworm disease in dogs are:

  • Coughing (this can vary in frequency and severity)
  • Reluctance to exercise
  • Fatigues easily
  • Decreased appetite
  • Weight loss
  • In dogs with severe advanced disease, you may see a distended abdomen, labored breathing, pale gums, or discolored urine

The most common signs of heartworm disease in cats are:

  • Vomiting
  • Asthma-like symptoms (wheezing, labored breathing)
  • Poor appetite
  • Weight loss
  • In severe cases, the first clinical sign may be sudden collapse

How is heartworm infection diagnosed?

The American Heartworm Society recommends that dogs and cats be tested annually, even if they are on heartworm preventive. This is to ensure that the prevention plan is working. The test only requires a small sample of blood. In dogs, the test will look for a specific protein (antigen) in the blood that is released by the adult heartworms. The test is very sensitive and even a dog with a low number of adult worms will be positive. Dogs can also be screened by looking for the baby worms (microfilariae) in the peripheral blood but this test is not as sensitive as the antigen test.

In cats, heartworm infection can be harder to detect. Since their infections commonly only consist of low numbers of immature worms, the ideal test will screen for the antigen as well as an antibody level which detects exposure to heartworm larvae. Some cats may require other tests as well if the blood tests alone are not definitive. These may include x-rays of the chest or an ultrasound of the heart.

In our next installment, we will discuss treatment of heartworm infection in dogs and cats.

Tags: Ask the Vet, Health, Pet advice, Pet behavior, Pets, Preventative pet care
Close Window