Best Friends Pet Care : The Dog Dish
Best Friends Pet Care : The Dog Dish
Best Friends Pet Care : The Dog Dish

Tag Archives: Pet Safety

Pet Travel: Take Your Furry Sidekick Along, or Leave Him Behind?

Pet Travel: Take Your Furry Sidekick  Along, or Leave Him Behind?

As a pet parent, a road trip with a furry kid might seem like a dream come true. You’d love the opportunity to bond and share new experiences with him, and you’d certainly appreciate the company. But before you load your beloved pet into the car for the long haul, take a moment to reflect. A pet who’s a great companion at home, on walks, and on short trips around town won’t necessarily be an ideal travel buddy. Long trips aren’t right for every pet, and your pet’s needs should come before your desire to take him along.

Does My Pet have a Road-Worthy Temperament?

Like people, dogs have a wide range of different temperaments. Some are laid-back and easygoing, while others are nervous and high-strung. If your pet is adaptable, easy to please and likes new places and new people, he’s likely to be a great travel buddy.  However, if he’s nervous by nature, skittish about car rides, or anxious when confronted with something new, chances are, he’s not ready for a long trip. If your pet is nervous or fearful, don’t despair – with some training, he may eventually become a great pet traveler. He just may have to stay home this time around.

With appropriate training, commitment,  and patience, most temperament problems can be overcome. Your pet can become less sensitive to stimuli, and more suited for travel. That said, desensitizing training techniques aren’t a quick fix. You’ll need to dedicate the time, offer a lot of leeway and understanding, and let your pet set the pace.

Will This Trip be Fun for my Pet?

Will your pet be comfortable? Did you plan pet friendly activities he will enjoy? Your dog might love an impromptu hiking trip through the mountains or a glorious day on the beach, but he may not be so thrilled to share your mother’s tiny apartment with her cats while you head off to the golf course or sit alone in a hotel room  during your out-of-town business meetings, (in fact, many pet friendly hotels don’t allow pets to stay alone in rooms). You know your dog best, so you are the best person to judge whether this trip will be an enjoyable one for him – if not, you can adjust your plans to be more pet friendly, or you can let him stay home where he’s sure to be comfortable.

Is My Pet in Good Health?

If your pet is injured or under-the-weather, you may be tempted to take him along on your trip so you can watch over him. After all, no one will care for him like you do! However, it may be best for your pet to stay behind under the care of trusted friend or family member. You will be busy driving, after all, and you won’t really keep vigil over him. The trip may make him tired, distressed or uncomfortable – factors that will be difficult to remedy far from home. A pet in pain or discomfort may even act out, which won’t make for a pleasant trip for either of you.

If your pet is elderly, but in good health, you’ll need to make a judgment call. If he enjoys taking car trips and visiting new places, taking him along may very well be good for him. If he likes trips, but becomes uncomfortable easily, he may be better off at home. If you’re undecided, a quick trip to consult with your vet can help you figure out whether a road trip is in your pet’s best interest.

If your pet suffers from travel anxiety, routinely taking him on brief trips, or planning occasional trips that end up somewhere exciting and fun can help teach him that traveling is a rewarding experience. If your pet experiences motion sickness during car rides, all is not lost – a number of remedies exist to help alleviate his suffering, including reconditioning, traditional medications, and holistic remedies.

If your pet is up for it, hitting the road with him can be a fantastic way to break up the blahs, have some fun adventures, and spend some quality time together. However, even if your pet isn’t perfectly suited for travel right now, it doesn’t mean he never can be.

Safe travels and happy tails!

TripsWithPets.com is the premier online pet friendly travel guide — providing online reservations at over 30,000 pet friendly hotels & accommodations across the U.S. and Canada.  When planning a trip, pet parents go to TripsWithPets.com for detailed, up-to-date information on hotel pet policies and pet amenities.  TripsWithPets.com also features airline & car rental pet policies, pet friendly activities, a user-friendly search-by-route option, as well as pet travel gear. For more information, please visit http://www.tripswithpets.com

Tags: Pet Safety, Pet travel, Pet Vacation

A Secured Pet is a Safe Pet: Reduce Serious Risks by Restraining Pets on Car Rides

Trips with Pets
Only a few short decades ago, buckling up was optional for drivers and their passengers, and people were generally unaware of the serious dangers posed by riding in cars without safety belts. Today, all that has changed. Everyone uses a seatbelt, and wisely so. Those riding in the front seat can reduce their risk of fatal injuries by 45 percent and their risk of moderate to critical injury by 50 percent, just by buckling up. In addition, rear seat passengers riding without seatbelts increase the death rate of front seat passengers by up to 5 times.

Unfortunately, while our human passengers are now much safer on road trips, the same can’t be said for our pets. We are still woefully unaware of the importance of securing our furry family members on car rides.

Pet travel is on the rise, and with it is the number of pets who suffer serious injuries from being improperly secured on car rides. In fact, unrestrained or improperly restrained pets can pose a number of serious dangers, both to themselves, and to every passenger in the car.

Even pet travelers who are normally very tranquil and well-behaved can react unexpectedly during a car ride. They may become anxious, overly excited, or frightened. They may jump, run, make noise, or climb the seats – all of which can distract even the most conscientious driver and cause an accident.

What’s more, in the event of an accident, or even a sudden swerve or stop, an unrestrained pet can potentially become a very real hazard. During an accident, a vehicle traveling at just 30 mph can transform a harmless 15-pound child into a projectile with a force of 675 pounds. At the same speed, a 60 pound dog becomes a lethal 2700 pound projectile, which could very easily be flung into a windshield, or another passenger.

Other threats loom after car crashes, as well. In the aftermath of an accident, it’s very possible for a frightened pet to run away, run into traffic, or attack rescue workers or good samaritans who are trying to help.

Pet parents who are responsible in every other way often overlook the dangers of failing to restrain their pets. Many assume that because they’re just headed to the bank, or the pet store, or the dog park a couple of miles away, they’re relatively safe. However, most accidents occur during short trips around town – not on busy highways.

Fortunately, there are plenty of ways to safely restrain your pet without restricting his freedom or fun. A wide variety of vehicle restraint options are available for pet parents, and with a little research, you can find one that will perfectly suit your individual pet’s needs. Pet safety belts, pet car seats (with built-in seat belts), pet travel crates & kennels, and vehicle pet barriers are some of the best and safest choices.

Whichever pet restraint method you choose, be sure that you know how to use it properly, and that you give your pet ample time to adapt. If you choose a travel crate, you should begin acclimating him to it inside your home.

Place some of your pet’s favorite toys, loveys, or blankets inside the crate. Let your pet explore the crate, and go in and out at will. Once he seems used to the crate, place it in your vehicle and put him inside. Take a short car ride or two, then longer and longer rides until he seems completely comfortable.

If you choose a pet safety belt, let your pet wear the harness around the house, and give him time to get used to the feel of it before strapping them in the car. Start out with short car rides, then gradually extend them, just as you would the crate.

A couple of final tips: regardless of your chosen method of restraint, back seat or cargo area travel is always safest. Also, while your pet’s safety is essential, so is his comfort. Make sure his “seat” is comfortable, and that his restraint fits well and is properly placed.
Our pets depend completely on us for their care and their safety. Let’s do right by them, and make sure they are as safe and secure as our other family members in the car.

TripsWithPets.com is the premier online pet friendly travel guide — providing online reservations at over 30,000 pet friendly hotels & accommodations across the U.S. and Canada. When planning a trip, pet parents go to TripsWithPets.com for detailed, up-to-date information on hotel pet policies and pet amenities. TripsWithPets.com also features airline & car rental pet policies, pet friendly activities, a user-friendly search-by-route option, as well as pet travel gear. For more information, please visit http://www.tripswithpets.com

Tags: Dogs, Pet health, Pet Safety, Pet travel, Pets, Travel with pets

Preventing Accidental Poisoning in our Pets

Did you know that March 15th through the 21st is Poison Prevention Week? As a member of our Best Friends family, we want to help you keep all of your furry family members safe so here are a few tips on how to keep an accidental poisoning from happening in your home.

As a pet parent, you probably already know that your pets are very curious and like to get into things. One of their favorites is the trash can. If you can’t keep these out of site in a cabinet, then be sure all trash cans and diaper pails have locking lids. Move any open storage containers to a closet or up to a high shelf.

Prevent Accidental Pet Poisoning

Prevent accidental pet poisoning. Keep your pets safe with these helpful tips.

Also remember, just because the medication lid says “child-proof”, doesn’t mean it will be dog proof. Accidental ingestion of over-the-counter or prescriptions medications is a common reason that pets are brought in to the emergency room, so be sure to keep all of these out of reach at all times.

Other potential hazards that pet owners often forget about are backpacks and purses. These may contain medications or sugar-free gums or candies that can be toxic to pets, so be sure to keep them off the floor and out of reach as well.

Don’t forget to dog- and cat-proof the garage or floor level cabinets where you store cleaning supplies or solvents. If your pets spend any time in the garage, be sure all of these items are stored out of reach. Cabinets should be locked or securely fastened with baby-proofing latches to keep them from being pried open by curious paws. If any of these chemicals are spilled, be sure to clean up the spill right away. This is especially true for antifreeze which can be fatal if ingested (or even licked off of wet paws).

Prevention is the best medicine but, if you do have a pet emergency, be prepared. If it’s not already in there, put your veterinarian’s number in your phone so you don’t have to look it up in the event of an emergency. Another good resource to have at your disposal is the Pet Poison Helpline. This site has a comprehensive list of pet poisons and provides consultations (for a fee) in the event of an intoxication.

If you suspect that your pet has ingested a toxin, call your veterinarian right away. If you can tell them exactly what your pet ingested, they can do a better job of telling you what to do, so be sure to have the bottle or packaging handy if you can. It’s also important to be honest about what your pet may have gotten into. An emergency is not the time to be embarrassed or afraid of what your vet may think.

DON’T induce vomiting or give your pet a home remedy until you talk to a veterinary professional – you can sometimes do more harm than good. If your pet vomits on their own and you aren’t sure if what they ate is toxic, be sure to collect any packaging or plant material they throw up so you can describe it or show it to the vet.

As anyone who has been a pet parent knows, our pets can be mischievous and get themselves into trouble. Your best defense is to be proactive and vigilant about their surroundings so that you can prevent an accidental poisoning.

If you have any questions or concerns, please contact your nearest Best Friends veterinarian. For a list of our locations, please visit our locations page.

 

Tags: Ask the Vet, Pet health, Pet Poisoning, Pet Safety, Pets, Vet
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