Best Friends Pet Care : The Dog Dish
Best Friends Pet Care : The Dog Dish

ARCHIVE

2017

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Best Friends Pet Care : The Dog Dish

Pet Dental Health Month – Basic Extraction Principles

Brush Your Pet's TeethThe oral cavity has an abundant blood supply and an epithelial surface constantly bathed by saliva, a fluid rich in antimicrobial properties, resulting in oral tissue healing more rapid than skin. Sterile surgical preparation of the oral cavity for extractions is not necessary, however, using clean instruments and adequate preparation of the surgical working area is recommended. Good accessibility and exposure to the surgical site is important while creating gingival flaps to expose the tooth and alveolar bone adequately. Gentle tissue handling is used to minimize tissue trauma and promote faster healing. Appropriate instruments that are clean, sharp, well taken care of and stored properly will maintain the effectiveness and longevity of the instruments.

Preference for suture material will vary, however, absorbable sutures are recommended such as chromic gut, Vicryl or Monocryl. Suturing techniques may vary according to procedure, but generally a simple interrupted pattern is used.  Gingival flaps are created to adequately expose the alveolar bone over the roots.  One problem many veterinarians have is that they do not make a large enough flap and when they go to suture closed, the gingival flap may not be large enough to lay over the extraction site and as a result creates too much tension resulting in dehiscence of the flap. When closing gingival flaps there should be absolutely no tension, avoid unnecessary gaps and the sharp edges of alveolar bony crests with spicules should be smoothed with a diamond bur, all will promote optimal healing.

Tags: Ask a Vet, Cats, Dogs, Health, Pet advice, Pet Dental Health, Pet health, Vet

Pet Dental Health Month – Periodontal Treatment

Brush Your Pet's TeethProfessional periodontal treatment is important to the health and well-being of dogs and cats. Poor oral health may directly affect an animal’s overall health. Recent studies have shown there is an association with advanced periodontal disease and heart disease further validating the importance of periodontal health. Other studies have shown similar implications for the relationship of periodontal disease to heart, liver and kidney disease in the dog.

The goal of periodontal treatment is not only eliminating the causes of periodontal disease but to stop the progression of disease.  Recognition of dental and oral disease, careful treatment planning, appropriate treatment modalities, and a quality dental hygiene program to prevent or at the very least, decrease the progression of periodontal disease are all important in the overall health of dogs and cats.

Professional Periodontal Cleaning is not an elective procedure!! It is the responsibility of the veterinarian and the entire hospital team to recognize the importance of dental and oral disease, to educate the client appropriately, to develop a treatment plan for each patient, and to offer all available dental services available to treat the pet and promote a complete oral health care plan. Professional Periodontal Cleaning must be done under general anesthesia with preoperative blood work, an intravenous catheter, fluid therapy and sound anesthetic monitoring. Due to the aresoloation of bacteria during the periodontal cleaning, each team member performing the periodontal cleaning should wear protective eye wear, surgical masks and gloves.  With the dog or cat under general anesthesia it will be easier to identify dental disease and abnormalities that otherwise would not be found while the patient is awake or only sedated. Dental radiographs need to be taken (only under general anesthesia) to identify disease such as bone loss that would not be discovered clinically. With those hospitals that have dental radiology capability, full mouth dental radiographs should be taken for all first time dental cleaning patients not only as a base line, but to identify any disease under the gum line that would otherwise go undetected.

Tags: Ask the Vet, Dogs, Health, Pet advice, Pet dental health month

Pet Dental Health Month – Periodontal Disease

Brush Your Pet's Teeth

Periodontal disease is the loss of the periodontal attachment apparatus (periodontal ligament, alveolar bone, cementum and gingiva). Since 75-85% of these structures are identified below the soft tissues of the oral cavity (e.g. gingiva, alveolar mucosa, and palatal mucosa), a thorough clinical subgingival evaluation and intraoral radiographs are required to assess, diagnose and treat periodontal disease.

Periodontal disease may be potentiated by, but not limited to, malocclusions, crowding and rotation of teeth, systemic disease, nutritional status, individual patient susceptibility, genetics, trauma, and increased tooth to jaw size ratios.

The clinical signs of periodontal disease are often hidden and insidious. Halitosis, gingivitis, supragingival plaque and calculus, reluctance to chew, head shyness, pawing at the mouth, dropping food, sneezing, nasal discharge, are clinical signs. Unfortunately, many of those clinical signs require astute client observation and/or careful questioning from the clinician. Most commonly, there may be no obvious clinical signs to the owner and untrained veterinarian.

Stages of periodontal disease:

Stage 1 – Marginal gingivitis with no attachment loss. Minimal plaque and calculus

Stage 2 – Moderate gingivitis, bleeding upon probing. More plaque and calculus     accumulation is present, especially in the gingival sulcus. Dental radiographs may show signs of up to 25% attachment loss and some horizontal bone loss may be evident.

Stage 3 – Moderate periodontal disease. Periodontal pockets may be present and dental radiographs may show signs of attachment loss between 25% and 50%. Teeth may become mobile. Vertical bone loss and infra-bony pockets may be present.

Stage 4 – Severe periodontal disease. Periodontal pockets greater than 9 mm. Attachment loss is greater than 50%. Significant infrabony pockets with very mobile teeth associated with severe halitosis and generalized stomatitis.

 

Tags: Ask the Vet, Cats, Dogs, Health, Pet dental health month, Pet health, Preventative pet care
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